February 27th, 2015
As iron is heated, the arrangement of the atoms in the solid changes several times before the iron finally melts. This unusual behavior is one reason why steel is so strong. The atomic-level details of how and why iron takes on so many different forms during heating remains a mystery, however. Recent work by Caltech CDAC scientists...
February 11th, 2015
Only a small fraction of our planet’s total carbon budget is found at the surface. In fact, Earth’s mantle is thought to be the largest carbon reservoir. Carbonates, and in particular ferromagnesite ((Mg,Fe)CO3), are likely candidates for deep-Earth carbon storage and therefore play a key role in the deep carbon cycle. The behavior of...
February 10th, 2015
Carbon exists in a variety of structural motifs as a result of its ability to adopt sp-, sp2-, and sp3-type bonding modes. Graphite, diamond, lonsdaleite (hexagonal diamond) are well-established allotropic forms of carbon, but in recent years fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene and even amorphous carbon have received a increasing attention...
January 8th, 2015
CDAC is pleased to announce the release of our Annual Report for 2013-2014.
December 18th, 2014
In a paper recently released in Physical Review Letters, a group including CDAC graduate student Dane Tomasino, CDAC Partner Choong-shik Yoo (both from Washington State University), and Jesse Smith from HPCAT, report the significant discovery of a novel layered, singly-bonded polymeric form of nitrogen (LP-N...
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